Shams Abu Dhabi

Sorouh Developments
Chiller Plant Design
Al Reem Island, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Project cost 
$192 million construction costs
Time frame 

Project award - November 2007
Chiller plant design completed - January 2008
First plant construction completed - Second Quarter 2009
Additional plant construction - To be determined

Practice areas involved 
District cooling systems
Building, mechanical, electrical, plumbing (MEPT)
Key services provided 
Planning
Design
The challenge 

The Gulf Region is experiencing an unparalleled real estate development boom, and with it, unprecedented demand for air conditioning. The Shams Abu Dhabi development in the United Arab Emirates is a case in point. This $6.9 billion development on lush, green Al Reem Island will soon be home to 55,000 people; 100 skyscrapers; 22,000 residential housing units; retail and social facilities; and a 10.8 million-sq-ft park. With district cooling now the region's preferred building cooling method, Sorouh turned to WM Group to create design and construction documents for the design-build construction of three 40,000-ton chilled-water plants to serve this premier development. Although primary-secondary pumping is used almost exclusively in the UAE, WM Group had a better solution in mind: a variable-volume primary pumping system.

The smart solution 

In preparing its designs for each of these plants, WM Group included a total of eight ‘chiller modules' consisting of two 2,500-ton dual-compressor chillers in series - or 16 2,500-ton chillers in all. Connected by a common distribution system, each plant has an eight-cell, field-erected rooftop cooling tower designed to operate in the dusty desert environment. WM Group devised a variable-volume pumping system - unique for the UAE - that saves energy and enables the different plants to be easily interconnected in a virtual central system. WM Group's designs for these plants also encompassed ventilation, plumbing, fire protection, domestic water and fire alarm systems.

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell Medical Center

Cogeneration Plant Feasibility Study
New York, N.Y.

Project cost 
$20 million construction cost
Time frame 

Project award - December 2003
Feasibility study completed - April 2004
Approval granted from utility - Fall 2004
CHP plant construction completed - October 2008

Practice areas involved 
Cogeneration/combined heat and power (CHP)
Key services provided 
Planning
Design
The challenge 

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital's (NYPH's) renowned Weill Cornell Medical Center in Manhattan is supplied with chilled water and high-pressure steam from a central utilities plant that also serves Cornell University Medical College. Recognizing its year-round need for both thermal and electric power, NYPH in 2003 commissioned WM Group to study the economic and physical feasibility of building a combined heat and power system at the central plant. Such a system would require paralleling with the utility grid, as Con Edison indicated that its substation was under severe short-circuit constraints and unable to accept any fault current contribution from the customer's power-generating equipment.

The smart solution 

As part of the feasibility study, WM Group conducted a detailed short-circuit study and proposed to use state-of-the-art circuit breakers along with a custom-made low-impedance transformer that met Con Edison's requirements of tripping the generator in half a cycle. NYPH became the first facility in Manhattan to receive Con Edison's approval of a CHP system paralleling with the grid. Based on the study results, NYPH decided to proceed with implementing a CHP system at the East 68th Street plant. Expected to save the medical center an estimated $5 million in annual energy costs, the plant is one of NYPH's recent energy efficiency improvements that earned the hospital the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2008 Energy Star Award for Sustained Excellence.

"[WM Group] has been responsive, creative and thorough. Projects they have engineered for us range from an entirely new 1,000,000 sf hospital to rebuilding a 60-year-old high-pressure steam plant without interrupting service to the facility. The projects have been consistently on time and within budget."

- Paul Schwabacher, PE
Assistant Director, Facilities
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

 

Columbia Medical Center

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

Boiler Plant Expansion and Chilled-Water System Optimization
New York, N.Y.

Project cost 
$15 million construction cost
Time frame 

Chilled-water piping modifications completed - April 2001
Boiler plant expansion completed - June 2003

Practice areas involved 
District cooling systems
District heating systems
Key services provided 
Planning
System optimization
Design
The challenge 

In 2001, as NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH) was preparing to install a new 120,000-lb/hr boiler and auxiliaries at its Columbia Medical Center boiler plant, the hospital needed to solve a problem: how to rig the new boiler, specified by another consultant, into the boiler room with its very limited access space. The hospital's chilled-water system operations and distribution were also in need of optimization at the time to increase capacity and correct flow problems. NYPH called on WM Group to tackle both these challenges.

The smart solution 

After the other consultant had specified a field-erected boiler, WM Group developed a smart solution for NYPH involving a packaged boiler, which ultimately reduced construction costs. The firm also studied the chilled-water plant system serving Columbia Medical Center using a hydraulic model and created an optimization plan that reconfigured the system to an all primary pumping system - further adding to the plant's cost savings.

Manhattan New York Temple - The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

MEP Renovation
New York, N.Y.

Project cost 
$13 million
Time frame 

Project award - June 2002
MEP renovation completed - August 2004

Practice areas involved 
Building, mechanical, electrical, plumbing (MEPT)
Key services provided 
Design
Construction administration
Commissioning
The challenge 

In 2002, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormon Church) announced plans to establish a temple in Manhattan within two years to meet the needs of its fast-growing congregation of 42,000. When the Church decided to adapt an existing building for this purpose, WM Group was called on to execute a full mechanical, electrical and plumbing renovation of a 40,000-sq-ft area within the structure - on a fast-track schedule. The project required close coordination between architectural, structural and MEPT trades.

The smart solution 

WM Group produced comprehensive MEPT design plans for the remodeled building, which included 100-ton air-cooled chiller and chilled-water system; a low-temperature heating system using steam-to-hot-water heat exchangers; and a new 120/208 V, 2000 A electrical service. In addition to installing these upgrades, the firm also provided construction assistance services and on-site startup and commissioning assistance. The temple opened in spring 2004 with a dedication celebration, tours for the general public and international media coverage.

Fiona Stanley Hospital

Central Energy Plant configuration Study
Murdoch, Australia

Project cost 
$1.4 billion total estimated construction cost
Time frame 

Project award - August 2007
Configuration study completed - November 2007
Central energy plant construction to be completed - Summer 2013

Practice areas involved 
District cooling systems
District heating systems
Cogeneration/combined heat and power (CHP)
Key services provided 
Planning
The challenge 

The Fiona Stanley Hospital is a new state-of-the art hospital to be constructed by 2013 in Murdoch, Australia, approximately 9 miles south of Perth. As Western Australia's flagship health facility and major trauma center, the 2.15 million-sq-ft hospital will be required to operate in post-disaster conditions. WM Group was chosen to study central energy plant configuration options - to include cooling, heating, thermal storage, power and cogeneration - and recommend a configuration and a plan to implement it that would both ensure secure energy supply and address environmental concerns.

The smart solution 

In August 2007, WM Group began its analysis of various combinations of central energy plant equipment configurations, taking into consideration environmental and permitting issues. To ensure the reliability and availability of this critical facility's energy supply, the study included a minimum equipment redundancy requirement of N+1 and the potential operation of the hospital in ‘island mode.' WM Group produced a detailed study of the various options, ultimately recommending a configuration that will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by nearly 44 percent compared to the base plant configuration.

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell Medical Center

WM Group's cogeneration analysis for this NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital medical center earned approval from Con Edison to install a new plant.

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Columbia Medical Center

Performing a minor modification, at this NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital facility, to the chilled-water system control sequence resulted in an immediate demand reduction of 650 kW.

South Nassau Communities Hospital

A change in the control sequence at South Nassau Communities Hospital increased the chilled-water return temperature from 47 F to 52 F, doubling the chilled-water delta T.

Pennsylvania State Capitol Complex

Improvements at the Pennsylvania State Capitol Complex have increased the chilled-water delta T from an old range of between 6 F and 7 F to a new range between 12 F and 19 F.

Bristol-Myers Squibb

New control logic on an air handler at Bristol-Myers Squibb resulted in an average 89 percent improvement in chilled-water delta T compared to an identical air handler using the old control logic.